Media and Politics in the United States 

Course description: We will examine print and television media, social media and the Internet; the constitutional status of the political media; who owns and controls the media; media bias; and what is its role in campaigns, elections, and policy-making. 

I. Introduction

            The Nature of Journalism
            Who Owns and Controls the Media
            Advertising, Rhetoric, and Truth

II. Media Defined

            Language and Signs
            Print Media
            Visual Media (TV)
            Digital Media (the Internet)
            Social Media

III. The Political Context

            The First Amendment and the Media
            Political Expression
            How the Media Shape Public Opinion
            Campaigns and Elections
           

IV. What the Media Does To Us and For Us

            Media and Political Power
            Information: Candidates and Policy Issues
            Political Marketing

V. The Political Media and Self-Government

            Political Media and Polarization
            Channel TV
            Media Bias and Media Spin 

VI. Reforming the Media

            The Ideal Media
            Constitutional and Political Obstacles to Reform
           

 Internet Resources          

Kate Vinton, “The 15 Billionaires Own America's News Media Companies“ –from Forbes Magazine, June 1, 2016

Editorial Board of The Wall Street Journal, "The Tale of Stormy Donald," March 26, 2018

Ashley Lutz, "These 6 Corporations Control 90% of the Media in America" --from businessinsider.com

"Who Owns the Media?" --from freepress.net

"Media in the United States" --from globaiissues.org

"Media and News" --from the PEW Research Center (journalism.org).

"U.S. Social Media and Politics - Statistics and Facts" --from statistica.com

"Do Social Media Threaten Democracy" --from The Economist, November 4, 2017

Susan Condor, Christian Tileagă, and Michael Billig, "Political Rhetoric" --from

Marshall McCluhan,
The Medium is the Message - Chapter 1 --from MIT

Museum -- "The Newseum is an interactive museum that promotes free expression and the First Amendment to the United States Constitution, while tracing the evolution of communication."

"Communicaton Studies" --from Wikipedia.org

Mark Thompson, Enough Said: What's Gone Wrong With the Language (St. Martins, 2016)

Amanda Taub and Max Fischer, "Where Countries are Tinderboxes, Facebook is a Match" --from The New York Times,
April 21, 2018

Vanessa Otero, "Keeping It Real: Tips and Strategies for Evaluating Fake News" --from Loyola Marymount University Library

Vanessa Otero, "All Generalizations Are False" --from Loyola Marymount University Library (allgeneralizationsarefalse.com)

"Media Bias in the United States" --from Wikipedia.org

Hannah Byrd Little, "Information Bias" --from the Journal of the Association of School Librarians, April, 2017

"Media and News" --from the PEW Research Center